Ways to Keep Deer Out of Your Garden

Ways to Keep Deer Out of Your Garden

Deer might be beautiful creatures to observe from afar, but their appetites can wreak havoc on gardens and flowerbeds. Here in Maryland, deer are an ever-present threat to your gardening efforts. That’s why we’ve put together a few tips on how to keep them from devouring your plantings.

Add Deer-Resistant Plants

Keep deer out of your garden with plants they’re not fond of. Plants with strong odors can deter deer from coming too close to your garden, as the smell stays on their legs and makes it hard for them to detect predators. The smell also interferes with their ability to find food.

Some plants to consider include lavender, marigolds, allium, clethra, salvia, catmints and foxgloves. These plants serve a two-fold purpose, keeping deer away and livening up your garden in the process.

Grab Some Soap

The scent of ordinary bar soap is a common deer repellent as well. HGTV suggests attaching soap bars to stakes around the perimeter of your garden, or hanging soap bars in trees or large bushes. You can also leave soap shavings around new plants, deterring deer and allowing the plants time to grow and mature.

Gentle hand soap lasts for about a month and should not affect your plants. Check the ingredients in the soap to ensure it has ingredients to repel rather than attract deer, as ingredients like coconut oil may draw deer into your garden.

Build a Fence

Fence off your garden with a few rows of clear fishing wire to keep deer at bay. Stake the perimeter of the garden with a tall piece of wood and string rows of fishing line to create the fence. It should be about 10 to 12 feet tall; deer are excellent jumpers.  If you don’t want a tall fence around your garden, consider building a fence that slants outward at 45 degrees and rises to about 4 feet. The added width should keep deer out as well.

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Keeping Japanese Beetles Out of Your Garden

Keeping Japanese Beetles Out of Your Garden

Japanese beetles were first found in North America in a New Jersey nursery in 1916. With no natural predators to regulate their populations, the insects soon began to devour plants in gardens up and down the Eastern Seaboard. Today, the Japanese beetle is still one of the most common and destructive invasive pest species in… Continue Reading